3D Scanning with Kinect v2

Posts by Jacob

Working on Alignment: Walkthrough

Working on Alignment: Walkthrough

By on Nov 3, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

To get a 3D scan of something, you take pictures all around it. Those pictures will naturally overlap. Our program helps you align these 3D pictures. Considering that properly aligning 3D snapshots is a pivot point between a good or bad 3D model, we are working this week on what the key points are in creating a good alignment the first time and what to look out for. (We will not be focusing on color as we get these alignments done; rather, we will focus on the specific techniques for getting a colorless 3D model produced at the best match to real life.) Alignment points When aligning two scans, you need to choose distinguishing marks on the scans to match. For example, we could match the left ripple in the curtain from the first scan to the left ripple in the curtain on the second scan. The program merges those two points together. However, to make this work, you need: 1) distinguishable points, 2) enough points. Distinguishable points Two of our office scans were of flat, empty walls, so there were no distinguishable points to match.  This makes alignment immensely difficult. The three scans we were able to merge effortlessly on the first try (see the picture below) were easy to do because there were multiple points we could easily distinguish to align the scans with (the fan blades, the curtains). Enough points In the picture above, we had distinguishable points, like the curtains, the fan blades, and the door. However, if we marked only one of those distinguishing features, the two scans would not align very well. To align well, we mark multiple sets of points. So, in scan A, I could mark the left ripple in the curtain, the far right fan blade, and a point on the door. On scan B (which overlaps some of scan A), I would mark the same three points so the picture would align. Having enough points spread across the scan aligns the snapshots correctly. Kinect distortion around edges We’ve noticed that the Kinect seems to curve more near the edges of the scan. This is most likely a calibration issue with the Kinect (the factory calibration does not seem to be 100% accurate), but it could also be an...

Read More
Key to Good Color – Lighting

Key to Good Color – Lighting

By on Nov 2, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you’ve ever seen a 3D scanning setup, you might have noticed that the person being scanned is surrounded with lights. This isn’t just a prop to make it look cool. Different Light Angles ruin merging colors Because 3D Scanning involves take different 3D Snapshots and merging them together, each shot is taken at a different angle and these different angles are merged together. When there is directional light being shined on an object, that object will have a higher contrast at different areas depending on the angle you are looking at it. To put it in an example- depending the angles, the brightest spot on a bald guy’s head will appear to move around as you walk around them while you look at that spot. How this affects 3D Scanning Here is an example of two 3D snapshots merged. First, the color images looked like this: Once merged together they looked like this: You may notice above the right eyebrow, there is a white splotch. Also the neck has some splotches as well. This is because of 2 things- Different lighting conditions cause the hardware brightness/contrast in the Kinect to adjust, meaning the entire color image is altered to accommodate a different lighting condition. Different angles of light cause the brightness to be different at different spots of the surface. Current Work Arounds Well, the standard practice is to just have better controlled lighting conditions, so no matter what angle you take the image from, there is uniform lighting. This seems to be done with either LED Strips or Defused lighting. We are considering to test this is a photography studio, to see if the lighting provided would be enough to handle this...

Read More
Getting Back To Basics- Filters

Getting Back To Basics- Filters

By on Oct 17, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The intention of the Kinect V2 hardware seems more on 3D Motion Capture than 3D Scanning. Because of this, there is a lot of unwanted data the destroys the quality of a good 3D Scan. With that in mind, we are re-evaluating our approach and will be focusing on what we can do to make it work as a 3D Scanner – Filters. Although you can see my neck is missing, a scan from a different angle will provide that data accurately. The goal then, isn’t to make bad data good, but to make it so you can easily capture just the good...

Read More
Note: Scan from Life is in no way affiliated with Microsoft. We are an entirely separate company that has created a product that is dependent on a Microsoft owned product.